High School Slang

An in-depth look on slang in our day and age

Alex Young, Author

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If there is one thing that never changes, yet always changes, it is that as the years go by new trends always seem to fluctuate throughout the world. In the 1970’s, the vibe was tie dye and “peace out, dude”. In the 1980’s, the jam was neon, member jackets, and boomboxes. In the 1990’s it was phat to rep flannel, chokers, and Air Jordans. In the 2000’s it was right to rock graphic tees, slim fit jeans, and JanSport. As 2018 begins and we come closer to the 2020’s, one thing that has made our decade stand out is the unusual type of slang words that have generated in the last few years. Some are reincarnations of the past, while others… are just something else.

To anyone who is older than the age of 25, do not feel bad if the following makes no sense. It does not make sense to a portion of the people that use modern-day slang anyway, so in reality, it is possible to be right in the mix.

There is nothing more exhilarating than experiencing a really fun high school party. The next day everyone is going to be talking about how “lit” it was, and how it was “high key” the best one of the year. Back in the day, someone could say the party was cool, but in this age, parties are not cool anymore; they’re either “lit” or “so dead.” So if your night was lit, congratulations, it was a banger.

One thing that is also “FR” (for real), is how “salty” people get when someone questions their slang words. Nothing is worse than when someone gets mad because someone else, who is not “hip” to current slang, asks them “what does that even mean?” That is a great way to kill a conversation and make everyone in the room have to take a timeout.

Another thing that is extra “sus,” AKA suspect or sketchy, is when adults, specifically teachers, ruin a slang word. Now some teachers can pull off modern-day slang, but others easily just make a fool of themselves or make the class “kinda blown.” That’s “v,” or very, “whack.”

One “low key” thing that people often do not realize though, is that these slang words come from everywhere. The globalization of social media, and even character limits in text, has really contributed to the creation of these words, and in fact, a lot of them are just shortened versions of normal words. Another way these words are started is because people will use them to reference something else without saying the actual word. Why call it Toronto, area codes 416 and 647, when it can be called “the 6?” Why call them police officers and DEA agents when they can be called “the 12?” These seem to be questions people are asking themselves today. On the other hand, an easy “clapback” to that would be that is it too “extra,” and that calling them what they are is the better way to do it. Otherwise it could be considered “throwing shade,” or wrong to the area or to the officers referenced.

When asked about modern slang, junior Maddi Koch said, “My favorite slang word is definitely ‘solid.’ It can really go with anything, and it also shows how intense the understanding between two people can be. ‘How did you do on the test?’ Solid.”

Unlike Koch, junior Maggie Harris prefers to use an older version of slang. “I say ‘tubular’ a lot,” says Harris. “I know it’s very 80’s but I like it. That’s totally tubular.” Koch and Harris’ statements just go to show that slang really can vary.

Most of the time, slang is not even intentionally used. It has become such a usual thing in society, that it is just seen as the norm. When a kid is “boolin’,” he is really just hanging out with his friends. Just like when a student is trying to get an A on their next test, they really just “gotta finesse it,” which means that they want to do well. If everyone stayed “woke,” or aware, to slang words, they really would not seem all that weird and people would not be as “shook,” or confused, as they are when they hear them.

Sophomore Colleen Daghita added onto Koch’s and Harris’ statements when she said, “My favorite slang word is ‘hip.’ It’s relatable to a lot of topics and it’s very universal in conversations.”

So as 2018 starts, “RN,” or right now, is the time for people to start understanding slang words. People should not keep taking the “L” and staring at people that use slang like they have 3 heads because in reality slang is actually a big part of society, as it has always been. So to the people that are not aware of many of the words used in this passage, it is time to “turn up,” get on your “grind,” and figure them out! Not being up-to-date on slang will definitely help someone get “curved” in a social outing and that it not a “bet” (something good).

 

Honorable Mentions:

Savage – unlike most

Bad – cool

Tough or Tuff – good
Ship – think a couple would work

Jaunt – the/my “thing”

Straight – normal

TBH – to be honest

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