Running it back

The second annual Mr. Battlefield competition is a go

Seniors+Sean+Hoffman+%28left%29+and+Matt+Collins+%28right%29%2C+contestants+in+Battlefield%27s+second+annual+Mr.+Battlefield+competition%2C+pose+together+the+day+of+the+winter+chorus+concert.

Seniors Sean Hoffman (left) and Matt Collins (right), contestants in Battlefield’s second annual Mr. Battlefield competition, pose together the day of the winter chorus concert.

Michael Barbuti, Author

Last year, Battlefield’s Key Club organized the first ever Mr. Battlefield Competition: a pageant show for guys. Key Club is putting the show together once again to help fund future Key Club activities, but more importantly to continue to raise school spirit. Each club and some elective classes got the chance to nominate a representative to participate in the show; however, only ten decided to do so.

The applicants were then voted on by the student body, with each vote costing a dollar as part of the fundraising for Key Club. The contestant with the most votes will get to start the night with points, a significant advantage. Now, on Saturday, January 12, the ten students will compete for the title of Mr. Battlefield.
The competition itself is a stereotypical pageant show. It begins with a formal attire walk out and introduction of the participants, including their background and interests. Following this is the talent portion of the show, in which contestants will have one minute to perform an act of their choice. After the displays of talent, the representatives come together to perform a group dance for the judges, and then first cuts are made. The five remaining boys then work together in a teamwork activity that will remain a secret until the night of the event. Then comes the first question and answer portion of the night, after which the pool is cut to just three remaining contestants. Finally, there is one more question and answer section and then the judges make their decision on who will be crowned Mr. Battlefield.

This year’s show has a special theme: cereal. This theme will be incorporated in different aspects of the show and the stage design. Most importantly, the cereal theme will play into helping out the Haymarket Food Pantry. Caitlin Nguyen, the President of Key Club, says, “General admission is $7; however, if you bring in a box of cereal, which will be donated to the Haymarket Food Pantry, then admission costs $5.” Key Club hopes to provide a substantial donation to the Haymarket Food Pantry from cereal collections at the show.

Based on experiences from putting together last year’s event, Key Club will be implementing some changes in their set up to make things run more smoothly. Senior Rohan Vij, the Secretary of Key Club and main organizer of the event, says, “Setting up and planning for the event is a long process that takes place months in advance.” They have to plan the activities taking place in the event, the decorations, admissions, outreach, and the schedule of the day of the show. Additionally, organizers have to ensure that contestants know their roles and responsibilities. One thing they learned from last year is to have the dress rehearsal the night before instead of the day of the show because it was way too grueling last year. Planning the event is a very elaborate and difficult undertaking for Key Club.

Senior Colton Matthews represented the National Honor Society in last year’s pageant show. Matthews enjoyed the experience, and says, “It really broadened my horizons about the kind of talents Battlefield possesses and how diverse we really are.” The only change he wanted to see this year was having a question and answer portion before the first cuts.

Key Club puts a lot of time and effort into making the show a success. This year they hope to top last year’s show, making it an incredible time for contestants and the audience alike while also supporting the Haymarket Food Pantry.